Sonnenblumenbrot

Years ago I made a request to a German teacher who was a regular customer at my bakery, that when she went on her next trip to Germany to please bring me back a bread cookbook or two and I’d pay her for them. The ones she brought were in German, as I had hoped, and had some great pictures too!

Now, I don’t speak German. That was the language class I took for a few semesters in high school. In hindsight I should have taken Spanish. The only phrases I remember are “I don’t know” and “I have no money”.  Really useful phrases (insert eye-roll), not something like “where do I find great food?” or “two beers please” (my best Spanish phrase at the moment). Nope. I won’t be traveling to Germany any time soon the way it sounds.

The recipes look wonderful, or the pictures do at least. I started roughly translating a few that I wanted to try first shortly after receiving the books. Well, I received a request for a sunflower seed bread and wouldn’t ya’ know there’s a recipe for that in both cookbooks!

Sonnenblumenbrot

Sometimes I question my sanity.

Upon hearing the request for the Sonnenblumenbrot my first thought was “well shoot, I should have planted sunflowers this year.” My second thought was “I need to make sure I finished translating that recipe.”

Did you know that most grocery stores these days sell sunflower seeds that are shelled, roasted or raw, salted or not?! Did you also know that in a few short months with a good growing season I can grow sunflowers, the flower heads can be dried and seeds harvested? Then, in the fun of my own kitchen they can be shelled, roasted and salted if I like. It’s true. I’ve done it.

Another little tip here: there’s this huge entity called Google that one can type “Sunflower Seed Bread” and find all sorts of recipes in English all ready to go. Which is about how much time I honestly had to commit to this recipe at the time. On the other hand, I really like to create my own recipes. This time I decided to roughly translate the German and make my own measurements since I don’t have any metrics in my kitchen at the moment was at least honest with myself when saying I don’t have time to convert measurements.

Lucky for me the recipe I was hoping to use had been translated enough to know the ingredient list which is all I really needed at that time. Even with that I did some substituting and changing and by the end of it all all I really needed was the picture I guess.

There was a mini loaf left when the baking was all said and done. It turned out really good. I’ll probably keep that recipe… in English.

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