Lace on the Walls

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On piece of charm that came in our little farmhouse is a built-in china hutch in the dining room. I love built-in cabinets for some reason. This one is no different; old dark stained exterior and lighter painted interior.

I had planned to paint the inside before loading it with heirloom pieces but by the time we painted two bedrooms, the dining room, the living room and a few of the old panel doors I had had enough paint for a while.  I still wanted to “dress up” the inside of the cabinet though. Lace was the perfect way to go! (and it will match the dining room light, which is a piece of work all it’s own).

I’ve put fabric on the walls like wallpaper using spray starch before. It didn’t work real great for me, kinda. It was more work than it was worth really. So I knew I didn’t want to go that route but I still needed a way to keep the lace on the wall with the option to remove it someday without too much hassle.

Elmer’s Glue! You know the kind you were taught not to eat in kindergarten. Yep! That’s the stuff. It doesn’t stain, it’s non-toxic (as glue can get anyway) and it will wash off the wall when I need to remove it!

Here’s what I did:

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First I washed the whole cabinet out, walls, shelves everything.

I then measured the height and width of each wall I wanted lace on.  I cut the lace to fit with about an extra inch or so on all sides.

I used thumb tacks starting in the middle of the wall and tacked the lace on the top. I worked my way to the outside. When you do this be sure not to pull it tight. When the glue dries it will shrink the lace a bit.

I mixed my glue with water; roughly 50/50 ratio.

Using a sponge I applied the glue to the lace on the wall. Giving a good, thick coat. Too thick and it will run, too thin and the lace sometimes pulls away from the wall.

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After letting everything dry over night, I took out the tacks and with a sharp angled scissors I trimmed the excess lace. I had planned to use a sharp razor blade to do the trimming but I didn’t have one sharp enough. Even my best fillet knife didn’t do the trick.

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There you have it! Lace wallpaper! Looks nice and easily removed with warm water and soap when the time comes!

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The High Chair Restoration (part 2)

If you missed part 1 it can be found here.

Ok, Let’s talk Gorilla Glue. It’s great stuff, it holds things together better than any glue I’ve used before. I don’t want a wobbly chair, so between the glue and screws nothing should move. That’s all fine and dandy. The problem with Gorilla Glue is it can be a stringy, foamy, sloppy mess! Which is what I ended up with. Not to mention the pieces of the chair were not going together very smoothly.

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I had absolutely had it for the day when Dad and the Mister came to the rescue. I don’t know how they did it, ( I went to the house ) but they got it together. Dad got out his clamps and it’s looking good again.

I used an oil based stain, which I put on before we started to assemble. I was sure to not get the stain on the ends of the spindles or in the corresponding holes. This worked very much to my advantage. Once my sloppy Gorilla Glue dried and foamed it was very easy to lightly scrape off the stained wood.

Then a few coats of varnish and done! Well almost, the little mister will need to be buckled in or he will most likely slip out. So next step is to get the leather out and make some straps with snaps.

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Here comes…

There’s a lot going on at the farm right now be sure to watch for the up coming posts!

The sheep have been sheered and it’s time to turn the fleece to a sweater. (Ok not our sheep, that will come later. But I do have a few fleece to tend to)

The pigs have been butchered. I should talk about the butchering, bacon making, ham curing, chop cutting pig processing,  but then what would I talk about next fall. Fat is being rendered and soap being made this time.

We are also going to talk about hide tanning too! But for now I have some steer hide ready to be tooled.

Cheese is in the works to start aging.

There’s some lace being put into a “built in” in the dining room. (I know it doesn’t sound to interesting but it’s actually kinda neat.)

The barn needs some help and repair.

The summer kitchen plans are getting close and will hopefully be in use by next year.

There’s more to come in the kitchen, the craft room, the garden and the barn yard.  Some things we are starting in the middle of the process, but don’t worry we will circle back to the beginning too!

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Homemade Cheese Press

I like to try new things… all the time… I want to learn it all! In my quest for learning new things I decided to tackle cheese next. There are a million different kinds all using the same basic ideas and techniques and all end with a different product. There a few cheeses that are pretty basic and can be made in any kitchen with minimal equipment and ingredients but I’m more interested in the aged cheeses.

This brings me to needing a basic cheese press to produce the delicious cheese wheel. I wasn’t interested in spending too much to buy one, to be honest I really didn’t want to spend any money all.

As luck would have it, my dad is building another shed and had some pretty nice wood scrapes. He also had a piece of 6 inch pvc that he donated to my project. A quick trip to the hardware store for nuts, washers, springs and all-thread rod and I was in business.

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It’s not the prettiest contraption I’ve ever made but it’s functional.

I used an 8 inch piece of 2×8 for the base and two 8 inch pieces of 2×4 for the top cross pieces. I drilled a hole on each end of  the bottom of the base about half way through with a large bit. Then I drilled the center of each hole all the way through with a bit slightly larger than 3/8inch. (the all-thread rods I bought were 3/8 in and need to fit through the holes). I lined up the 2×4’s and drilled holes on each end to line up with the ones in the base.

Then to assemble  I used a lock washer and nut on the bottom of the rod to secure it through the base. The lock washer and nut fit in the larger hole that was drilled half through so they don’t rub on whatever surface I set the press on. On the top of the base is another nut with a flat washer.

The pipe is set on the base and the first  2×4 is slid on to the rods. Then another flat washer topped with a heavy spring. The next 2×4 is slid on the rods and fastened with a flat washer and wing nut.

I also cut 3 circles out of a 2×8 to fit inside the pvc pipe. These are what is pressed onto the cheese to get a uniform wheel. Depending on the amount of cheese to be press all three circles may not be needed.

Now for the fun of making cheese!

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The High Chair Restoration

I love things that are old, used and can be up-cycled or repurposed. I had mentioned to my mother earlier this year that I would love an old wooden high chair. Something that would stand the test of time and could possibly be passed on to my children.

I had found a few wooden chairs at box stores. I wasn’t impressed. There were what I thought to be over priced and still had a fair amount of plastic. The quest was on to find one that fit the “old and no plastic” specifications that I had hoped for.

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Wouldn’t you know, on the way back from the cities my mom spotted a high chair on the front step of an antique shop. The price must have been right because she pulled over and hauled it home!

It’s turned into one of my fall projects. Little Mister won’t be using it until this winter but the longer it sits the more projects pile up behind it.

The first step to disassemble the chair looked to be a bit challenging as there appeared to be tiny finishing nails holding the spindle in. But with a little wiggling it practically fell apart. Good thing I decided to disassemble or the little guy may have ended up on the floor. Ok, so it didn’t come apart that easy but it wasn’t nearly as bad as it could have been.

IMG_0665Then was the task of stripping and sanding the old finish and stain off. A little wood stripper and scrapper got the process started. The pieces that wouldn’t work in the lathe I sanded by hand. Thank God I didn’t have to do it all by hand! I love the decorative spindles and such but sanding all the little crevices takes a fair amount of time.

IMG_0666Once sanded, the real fun began… Staining. I had a little can of stain left over from the farmhouse style table my husband and I made this spring that I used for the chair. Not much of my furniture matches and yet somehow it all mixes well together. But, waste not, want not. So I used up the last of what I had for stain. A few pieces the same won’t hurt either.

Next will be assembly…

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