The High Chair Restoration (part 2)

If you missed part 1 it can be found here.

Ok, Let’s talk Gorilla Glue. It’s great stuff, it holds things together better than any glue I’ve used before. I don’t want a wobbly chair, so between the glue and screws nothing should move. That’s all fine and dandy. The problem with Gorilla Glue is it can be a stringy, foamy, sloppy mess! Which is what I ended up with. Not to mention the pieces of the chair were not going together very smoothly.

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I had absolutely had it for the day when Dad and the Mister came to the rescue. I don’t know how they did it, ( I went to the house ) but they got it together. Dad got out his clamps and it’s looking good again.

I used an oil based stain, which I put on before we started to assemble. I was sure to not get the stain on the ends of the spindles or in the corresponding holes. This worked very much to my advantage. Once my sloppy Gorilla Glue dried and foamed it was very easy to lightly scrape off the stained wood.

Then a few coats of varnish and done! Well almost, the little mister will need to be buckled in or he will most likely slip out. So next step is to get the leather out and make some straps with snaps.

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Here comes…

There’s a lot going on at the farm right now be sure to watch for the up coming posts!

The sheep have been sheered and it’s time to turn the fleece to a sweater. (Ok not our sheep, that will come later. But I do have a few fleece to tend to)

The pigs have been butchered. I should talk about the butchering, bacon making, ham curing, chop cutting pig processing,  but then what would I talk about next fall. Fat is being rendered and soap being made this time.

We are also going to talk about hide tanning too! But for now I have some steer hide ready to be tooled.

Cheese is in the works to start aging.

There’s some lace being put into a “built in” in the dining room. (I know it doesn’t sound to interesting but it’s actually kinda neat.)

The barn needs some help and repair.

The summer kitchen plans are getting close and will hopefully be in use by next year.

There’s more to come in the kitchen, the craft room, the garden and the barn yard.  Some things we are starting in the middle of the process, but don’t worry we will circle back to the beginning too!

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The Art of the Wood Pile

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Growing up in northern Minnesota we spent time each fall cutting, splitting, hauling and stacking firewood to heat the house for the upcoming winter. After college I moved to North Dakota for a while. There’s no trees to speak of there, thus no firewood for winter.

We joke about the Dakota chain saws. The ones we saw used there were, well, tiny. They looked like something the kids would have used to help dad cut wood. Something just big enough to cut a fence post. But I s’pose there’s no need for anything bigger out there. The other thing I noticed was that how to properly stack a wood pile was not common knowledge. The few that I saw were a mess to say the least.

Being back in the North Country and again stacking firewood in the fall, there are a few things I would like to share.

The wood that will be burned this winter needs to be cut, split and stacked before last winter. This gives it time to dry. If the wood isn’t dry when it’s time to burn you’ll have a heck of a time getting a fire lit and keeping it going will be frustrating as well.

The wood that is nice and light, and easy to carry is crap. It will be like burning paper and you will spend your day stoking the fire and go through a ton more wood. Hard woods are what your looking for; oak and maple are common examples. They are also more work to move because they are much heavier. But the extra weight is definitely worth it.

When your cutting logs make sure they are a uniform length . We tend to use the bar of the chain saw as a guide. Keep in mind that these pieces need to fit in the stove at some point. Having them cut to a uniform length will also keep your pile looking neat and tidy.

Stacking the wood should be done with the split side down and the fattest end in the front. By stacking this way you will end up with a pretty sturdy pile and in the event it does topple it will fall away from you and not on you. You don’t want a leaning stack, but by putting the fat end towards you your stack will lean away from you, should it lean at all.

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Pickled Eggs and Buttershots

Picklegegg

The last of the root vegetables are out of the ground just in time for the snow to move in…seriously it’s October and snowing like December right now.

It’s time to settle in for a long winters nap… Not really it’s time for indoor activities, like ice fishing. Ok so I’m jumping the gun a bit. There’s still the national holiday of Deer Opener and pheasant hunting to do before the ice fishing begins. But it’s time to start preparing for it.

Tuck the boat in the barn for winter and make sure the ice house is readily accessible. Get all the ice rods ready and check the tip-up’s. Minnow bucket, heater, propane tanks may need filling, pickled eggs and Buttershots and of course the auger. Yes it’s a bit early but I like to know what I have that may need replacing or what I can’t live without this season. It gets pretty cold around here and as you can tell I like my outdoor activities indoors (sometimes) when it’s 50 below.

What? Why yes, I said “pickled eggs and Buttershots“. What else do you eat when your fishing?

My first experience with pickled eggs was years ago. My brother went on a fishing trip with my dad and friends out west, when he came home he was telling us how they ate pickled eggs and gizzards. Yum. Not so much, I still don’t get into the gizzards but pickled eggs on the other hand are pretty good.

The pickled eggs I make need a month or two before they are ready to eat. You can see why it’s so important  to begin ice fishing prep so early now. It’s a very simple recipe I use and lends itself to so many flavors.

Pickled Eggs
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1 1/2 dz. Hard Boiled Eggs, cooled and pealed 3 c. Apple Cider Vinegar 3 c. Water 2 1/2 tbsp. Kosher Salt 2 tbsp. Crushed Chili Peppers 2 ea. Sprigs of Fresh Dill Few Black Peppercorns 6 ea. cloves of Garlic
Pickled Eggs
Print Recipe
1 1/2 dz. Hard Boiled Eggs, cooled and pealed 3 c. Apple Cider Vinegar 3 c. Water 2 1/2 tbsp. Kosher Salt 2 tbsp. Crushed Chili Peppers 2 ea. Sprigs of Fresh Dill Few Black Peppercorns 6 ea. cloves of Garlic
Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 dozen Hard Boiled Eggs cooled and pealed
  • 3 cup Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 3 cup Water
  • 2 1/2 tbsp Kosher Salt
  • 2 tbsp Crushed Chili Peppers
  • 2 each Sprigs of Fresh Dill
  • few Black Peppercorns
  • 6 cloves garlic
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Dissolve the salt in the water and vinegar.
  2. Place everything but the eggs and brine in a 2qt glass jar.
  3. Then add the eggs and fill the jar with the brine to the top.
  4. Let the jar sit in the refrigerator for at least a month. (I prefer two to three months).
Recipe Notes

Then enjoy in the fish house!

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Pickled Eggs For Luke
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Pickled Eggs For Luke
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Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 dz Hard Boiled Eggs cooled and pealed
  • 3 cup Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 3 cup Water
  • 2 1/2 tbsp Kosher Salt
  • 2 each Slices of Yellow Onion
  • 1-2 each Jalapeno sliced
  • 2 each Fresh Dill Sprigs
  • few Black Peppercorns
  • 6 each Garlic cloves smashed
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Dissolve the salt in the water and vinegar.
  2. Place everything but the eggs and brine in a 2qt glass jar.
  3. Then add the eggs and fill the jar with the brine to the top.
  4. Let the jar sit in the refrigerator for at least a month. (I prefer two to three months).
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Farmer’s Cheese

Farmer’s Cheese has a few different names, dry cottage cheese and uncreamed cottage cheese to name a couple.

Recipes for farmers cheese can be found anywhere most all are the same. It’s the most basic cheese to make because it requires no cultures to make. Milk, vinegar, and salt are the main ingredients. Some call for the addition of buttermilk too.

Depending on what you plan to do with it can be left as curds, whipped to a ricotta texture or pressed to use as a soft sliced cheese. When left as curds it can be mixed with homemade yogurt to fit the SCD too. Whipped it makes a great cheesecake.

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Curds and whey beginning to separate.

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Straining the whey from the curds.

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Dry curds. This can be left as is, whipped or pressed.

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Cheese wheel still wrapped in the cheese cloth.

Basic Farmers Cheese Recipe
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Basic Farmers Cheese Recipe
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Ingredients
  • 1 gallon Whole Milk
  • 1/2 cup Vinegar
  • 1 tbsp Kosher Salt
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Slowly heat the milk to 180 degrees.
  2. Remove from the heat.
  3. Add the vinegar and stir slowly. This will cause the milk to separate into curds and whey.
  4. I then strain this through a flour sack towel (save the whey too! It has many uses, like great bread!).
  5. Let the curds sit to drain for about 15 minutes.
  6. Add the salt.
  7. At this point it can be left to drain more and used as curds, or put into a glass jar and used as a creamed cheese, or put into a cheese press and used for sliced cheese.
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Buttermilk Farmers Cheese Recipe
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Buttermilk Farmers Cheese Recipe
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Ingredients
  • 1 qt Buttermilk
  • 1 gallon Whole Milk
  • 2 tbsp Vinegar
  • 1 tbsp Kosher Salt
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Slowly heat the whole milk to 180 degrees.
  2. Add the buttermilk and stir for a few minutes.
  3. Remove from the heat.
  4. Add the vinegar and stir slowly. This will cause the milk to separate into curds and whey.
  5. I then strain this through a flour sack towel (save the whey too! It has many uses, like great bread!).
  6. Let the curds sit to drain for about 15 minutes.
  7. Add the salt.
  8. At this point it can be left to drain more and used as curds, or put into a glass jar and used as a creamed cheese, or put into a cheese press and used for sliced cheese
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