Family Wheat Planting

It took more days than I had hoped but all of the grain to be planted for the season is in the ground. You see when you plant by hand it takes a few extra hours. When you add children to the task those extra hours get spread out over extra days. Little by little we got it done though.

The original wheat field was planted first. I used a small handheld broadcaster. Mike followed me with a fifty pound bag of seed, refilling my seeder every pass, all the while asking “Are you walking in a straight line? It doesn’t look like it.” (sigh) Once I had it all seeded he used took the drag, the four-wheeler and one kid riding at a time they smoothed the whole thing.

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Hive on the Hill


Every spring our flowering crab trees come alive. The sweet smelling blooms hang heavy with bees. You can hear them busily working from the other end of the barn. This year we are hosting our first hive. I can’t tell you how excited we are. I’ve been doing a lot of reading and decided to use essential oils in our hive instead of the recommended medication and chemical treatments. As I understand it, beekeeping is all trial and error so using the oils is where I’m starting.

Essential Oils In or Around Our Hive To-Date
Lemongrass (aff. link)
Wintergreen (aff. link)
Tea Tree (aff. link)
Lavender (aff. link)
Cinnamon (aff. link)

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Vanilla Honey Crème Brulee

It seems like a long time ago I was anxiously waiting for fresh duck eggs for pastries and desserts. After that and before the fox I was able to gather eggs for the kitchen and some for hatching. I wasn’t sure if there would be a noticeable difference when using duck eggs verses chicken eggs. There is. I can see why some pastry chefs search out duck eggs. They add a subtle richness that isn’t there with chicken eggs.

I tried the eggs in different breads, challah and brioche both lent themselves quite nicely to the change. The recipe that exposed the richness of the change in egg was my Vanilla Honey Crème Brulee.

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The Cows are Out

“Hey, so, ah, the cows somehow got the red gate off the hinge and everybody is in the corral. G.W. is trying to breed Lucy already.” That’s right, another one of Mike’s famous calls from the barn.

All afternoon the rain has been off and on; the “on” in the form of heavy, soaking down pours and some hail at one point. We had planned to put some dehorning paste on Margo tonight. Her horns are just barely little bumps, but big enough that we can tell she will have horns. It’s best we take care of them now before they attach to her skull and she gets any stronger. She’s got a lot of might in that little frame.

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