Pickled Eggs and Buttershots

Picklegegg

The last of the root vegetables are out of the ground just in time for the snow to move in…seriously it’s October and snowing like December right now.

It’s time to settle in for a long winters nap… Not really it’s time for indoor activities, like ice fishing. Ok so I’m jumping the gun a bit. There’s still the national holiday of Deer Opener and pheasant hunting to do before the ice fishing begins. But it’s time to start preparing for it.

Tuck the boat in the barn for winter and make sure the ice house is readily accessible. Get all the ice rods ready and check the tip-up’s. Minnow bucket, heater, propane tanks may need filling, pickled eggs and Buttershots and of course the auger. Yes it’s a bit early but I like to know what I have that may need replacing or what I can’t live without this season. It gets pretty cold around here and as you can tell I like my outdoor activities indoors (sometimes) when it’s 50 below.

What? Why yes, I said “pickled eggs and Buttershots“. What else do you eat when your fishing?

My first experience with pickled eggs was years ago. My brother went on a fishing trip with my dad and friends out west, when he came home he was telling us how they ate pickled eggs and gizzards. Yum. Not so much, I still don’t get into the gizzards but pickled eggs on the other hand are pretty good.

The pickled eggs I make need a month or two before they are ready to eat. You can see why it’s so important  to begin ice fishing prep so early now. It’s a very simple recipe I use and lends itself to so many flavors.

Pickled Eggs
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1 1/2 dz. Hard Boiled Eggs, cooled and pealed 3 c. Apple Cider Vinegar 3 c. Water 2 1/2 tbsp. Kosher Salt 2 tbsp. Crushed Chili Peppers 2 ea. Sprigs of Fresh Dill Few Black Peppercorns 6 ea. cloves of Garlic
Pickled Eggs
Print Recipe
1 1/2 dz. Hard Boiled Eggs, cooled and pealed 3 c. Apple Cider Vinegar 3 c. Water 2 1/2 tbsp. Kosher Salt 2 tbsp. Crushed Chili Peppers 2 ea. Sprigs of Fresh Dill Few Black Peppercorns 6 ea. cloves of Garlic
Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 dozen Hard Boiled Eggs cooled and pealed
  • 3 cup Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 3 cup Water
  • 2 1/2 tbsp Kosher Salt
  • 2 tbsp Crushed Chili Peppers
  • 2 each Sprigs of Fresh Dill
  • few Black Peppercorns
  • 6 cloves garlic
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Dissolve the salt in the water and vinegar.
  2. Place everything but the eggs and brine in a 2qt glass jar.
  3. Then add the eggs and fill the jar with the brine to the top.
  4. Let the jar sit in the refrigerator for at least a month. (I prefer two to three months).
Recipe Notes

Then enjoy in the fish house!

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Pickled Eggs For Luke
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Pickled Eggs For Luke
Print Recipe
Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 dz Hard Boiled Eggs cooled and pealed
  • 3 cup Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 3 cup Water
  • 2 1/2 tbsp Kosher Salt
  • 2 each Slices of Yellow Onion
  • 1-2 each Jalapeno sliced
  • 2 each Fresh Dill Sprigs
  • few Black Peppercorns
  • 6 each Garlic cloves smashed
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Dissolve the salt in the water and vinegar.
  2. Place everything but the eggs and brine in a 2qt glass jar.
  3. Then add the eggs and fill the jar with the brine to the top.
  4. Let the jar sit in the refrigerator for at least a month. (I prefer two to three months).
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Farmer’s Cheese

Farmer’s Cheese has a few different names, dry cottage cheese and uncreamed cottage cheese to name a couple.

Recipes for farmers cheese can be found anywhere most all are the same. It’s the most basic cheese to make because it requires no cultures to make. Milk, vinegar, and salt are the main ingredients. Some call for the addition of buttermilk too.

Depending on what you plan to do with it can be left as curds, whipped to a ricotta texture or pressed to use as a soft sliced cheese. When left as curds it can be mixed with homemade yogurt to fit the SCD too. Whipped it makes a great cheesecake.

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Curds and whey beginning to separate.

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Straining the whey from the curds.

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Dry curds. This can be left as is, whipped or pressed.

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Cheese wheel still wrapped in the cheese cloth.

Basic Farmers Cheese Recipe
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Basic Farmers Cheese Recipe
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Ingredients
  • 1 gallon Whole Milk
  • 1/2 cup Vinegar
  • 1 tbsp Kosher Salt
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Slowly heat the milk to 180 degrees.
  2. Remove from the heat.
  3. Add the vinegar and stir slowly. This will cause the milk to separate into curds and whey.
  4. I then strain this through a flour sack towel (save the whey too! It has many uses, like great bread!).
  5. Let the curds sit to drain for about 15 minutes.
  6. Add the salt.
  7. At this point it can be left to drain more and used as curds, or put into a glass jar and used as a creamed cheese, or put into a cheese press and used for sliced cheese.
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Buttermilk Farmers Cheese Recipe
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Buttermilk Farmers Cheese Recipe
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Ingredients
  • 1 qt Buttermilk
  • 1 gallon Whole Milk
  • 2 tbsp Vinegar
  • 1 tbsp Kosher Salt
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Slowly heat the whole milk to 180 degrees.
  2. Add the buttermilk and stir for a few minutes.
  3. Remove from the heat.
  4. Add the vinegar and stir slowly. This will cause the milk to separate into curds and whey.
  5. I then strain this through a flour sack towel (save the whey too! It has many uses, like great bread!).
  6. Let the curds sit to drain for about 15 minutes.
  7. Add the salt.
  8. At this point it can be left to drain more and used as curds, or put into a glass jar and used as a creamed cheese, or put into a cheese press and used for sliced cheese
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Homemade Cheese Press

I like to try new things… all the time… I want to learn it all! In my quest for learning new things I decided to tackle cheese next. There are a million different kinds all using the same basic ideas and techniques and all end with a different product. There a few cheeses that are pretty basic and can be made in any kitchen with minimal equipment and ingredients but I’m more interested in the aged cheeses.

This brings me to needing a basic cheese press to produce the delicious cheese wheel. I wasn’t interested in spending too much to buy one, to be honest I really didn’t want to spend any money all.

As luck would have it, my dad is building another shed and had some pretty nice wood scrapes. He also had a piece of 6 inch pvc that he donated to my project. A quick trip to the hardware store for nuts, washers, springs and all-thread rod and I was in business.

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It’s not the prettiest contraption I’ve ever made but it’s functional.

I used an 8 inch piece of 2×8 for the base and two 8 inch pieces of 2×4 for the top cross pieces. I drilled a hole on each end of  the bottom of the base about half way through with a large bit. Then I drilled the center of each hole all the way through with a bit slightly larger than 3/8inch. (the all-thread rods I bought were 3/8 in and need to fit through the holes). I lined up the 2×4’s and drilled holes on each end to line up with the ones in the base.

Then to assemble  I used a lock washer and nut on the bottom of the rod to secure it through the base. The lock washer and nut fit in the larger hole that was drilled half through so they don’t rub on whatever surface I set the press on. On the top of the base is another nut with a flat washer.

The pipe is set on the base and the first  2×4 is slid on to the rods. Then another flat washer topped with a heavy spring. The next 2×4 is slid on the rods and fastened with a flat washer and wing nut.

I also cut 3 circles out of a 2×8 to fit inside the pvc pipe. These are what is pressed onto the cheese to get a uniform wheel. Depending on the amount of cheese to be press all three circles may not be needed.

Now for the fun of making cheese!

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The High Chair Restoration

I love things that are old, used and can be up-cycled or repurposed. I had mentioned to my mother earlier this year that I would love an old wooden high chair. Something that would stand the test of time and could possibly be passed on to my children.

I had found a few wooden chairs at box stores. I wasn’t impressed. There were what I thought to be over priced and still had a fair amount of plastic. The quest was on to find one that fit the “old and no plastic” specifications that I had hoped for.

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Wouldn’t you know, on the way back from the cities my mom spotted a high chair on the front step of an antique shop. The price must have been right because she pulled over and hauled it home!

It’s turned into one of my fall projects. Little Mister won’t be using it until this winter but the longer it sits the more projects pile up behind it.

The first step to disassemble the chair looked to be a bit challenging as there appeared to be tiny finishing nails holding the spindle in. But with a little wiggling it practically fell apart. Good thing I decided to disassemble or the little guy may have ended up on the floor. Ok, so it didn’t come apart that easy but it wasn’t nearly as bad as it could have been.

IMG_0665Then was the task of stripping and sanding the old finish and stain off. A little wood stripper and scrapper got the process started. The pieces that wouldn’t work in the lathe I sanded by hand. Thank God I didn’t have to do it all by hand! I love the decorative spindles and such but sanding all the little crevices takes a fair amount of time.

IMG_0666Once sanded, the real fun began… Staining. I had a little can of stain left over from the farmhouse style table my husband and I made this spring that I used for the chair. Not much of my furniture matches and yet somehow it all mixes well together. But, waste not, want not. So I used up the last of what I had for stain. A few pieces the same won’t hurt either.

Next will be assembly…

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Feed Bag Tote

With chickens comes feed and with feed comes really nice bags that I can’t seem to throw away. (The plan is to soon be producing our own chicken feed but for now a little free range and a little store bought is what we have.) I have a vast collection of reusable grocery bags but over time they get worn and need replacing. I would look rather ridiculous going through the line at the market asking to have my groceries put in a 50lb. feed bag, so a little “nip-tuck” is in order.

I adapted the pattern for the tote from the one that I used years ago to make canvas totes. (I have a bag problem, I know. They’re just so handy!) The whole project takes an hour or so.  It’s a great way to use up the feed bag stock pile and it’s easy enough that the kids can make them too!

First things first, I give the bag a good wipe down. I don’t want dirt and feed dust in the sewing room.

IMG_0686Then I cut the bottom of the bag off (about 9 inches or so). Turn the  bag inside out and sew the bottom closed. Use two seam allowances so the bottom is good and sturdy. (1/2 inch and 1/4 inch)

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Next fold the centers of the top of the bag together. (you will end up with a “home plate” shape. Open the triangles and measure 10 inches across and mark. Sew the same double seam on the mark. Do the same to the other side. This is your square bottom.

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Then for the handles. Use the piece you cut from the bottom of the bag and cut 2 strips 3 inches wide. Cut these in half so you have 4 pieces 3 inches wide. Sew 2 together lengthwise. (Again, right sides together) Fold the edges in about a 1/2 inch on both sides. Securing with paper clips. Unlike fabric, pin holes don’t go away in the feed bag. To minimize the holes I use paper clips or binder clips instead. Fold the strap in half and sew both sides. (This will be done right sides out).

IMG_0700Once both handles are sewn, it’s time to attach them to the bag. With the bag still inside out fold the top edge down about an inch and a half. Fold the top down another inch and a half so the rough edge is hidden. Secure this with paper clips again. Measure and place the handles where you like. This bag is pretty close to square so just make sure the handles are opposite each other.

Hold the handles in place with a binder clip. They will be pointing down for now. Sew around the bottom of the hem on the top of the bag first. Then position the handles up (so they are coming out of the bag) and sew around the top. Both of these seams will be 1/4 inch allowances. I like to reinforce the handles by sewing an “X” on each.

IMG_0705At this point the bag is complete. You can cut the extra triangle from making the square bottom. I leave it in tack for a little extra bottom support.

 

 

Step by Step Pictures:

Feed Bag Tote

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Cut the bottom 10 inches off.

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“Home plate” shape. To make a square bottom.

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Open the triangles.

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Mark 10 inches across and sew.

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Cut 3 inch strips for handles.

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Cut the strips in half.

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Sew together. Fold edges in about a half inch.

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Fold in Half and sew both sides.

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Finished handles.

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Fold the top down an inch and a half.

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Then again to hide the rough edges.

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Measure and place handles. Sew bottom edge of the top.

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Sew the top with handles up and sew “x” for reinforcement.

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The extra triangles that can be cut or left for extra support.

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