Chicken Pot Pie

“Hey! Where did the meat birds go?!” It had been a couple weeks since we butchered chickens and the little miss just now noticed the empty chicken tractor. She wasn’t too concerned when we told her they were in the freezer and we had been eating them for supper. She was already on to talking about the new chicks in the coop.

The little boy helped plant the garden and I’ve had all the kids out there helping harvest now too. They’ve been busy pulling onions, picking tomatoes and corn. At ages 2 and 4 there’s some vegetable casualties, squished tomatoes and topless onions for starts. It’s so much fun to see the excitement in their eyes when they are handed a cob of corn and after they curiously peal back a few layers of husk they discover “there’s a corn in there!” The potatoes are next on the list. Mike and I can dig and the kids can do the picking there too.

“I found a corn!”
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We’re Farming! 

I’d say very rarely but I’m quite certain that this is the only time I have share a photo of us so unready for the day; my apologies. We were getting ready for a busy Saturday with a list longer than there would be time to complete. I had been putting off potting up my tomatoes for a week and it was well overdue.

I was waiting for my turn in the shower and decided that I would get the tomatoes done. No sense in wasting any time. The little boy wanted to help. He planted the seeds, kept them watered so why not let him help with the next step.

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Breaking Ground

May God give you dew from heaven and make your fields fertile! May he give you plenty of grain and wine! Genesis 27:28

We are hoping for vegetables from the freshly plowed fields, but wheat and wine would be nice too. The other evening the sod was rolling for our new garden. The soil underneath looked healthy, black and alive. There are few things I enjoy more in the spring than seeing freshly worked soil. The field has laid resting for years, the telling sign was the sizable saplings that had to be removed before the brush mower could knock down last year’s grass for the plow to then turn it under.

It was a family event, as most things are on our farm. After a quick supper we migrated down the hill to the neighbors shop as he put the plow on his tractor. Shortly thereafter we were on our way to “Erica Lane”.

One tractor, one plow, one driver and four spectators.

The kids played on the swing set for the first couple passes down the field. It wasn’t very long that we were all standing at the end of the first couple runs watching the plow cut through the top soil. Our neighbor was driving the tractor, my dad got the job of removing and replacing underground cable marking flags, while Mike and I kept the curious munchkins out of the way as they inspected the new land.

“This is our garden!” exclaimed the little boy. I asked him what we will be planting in there. “Um, we can plant bananas! And apples on trees! And berries!” “Carrots and potatoes too?” “No. Bananas.”

I have a little convincing to do before we start planting. I’m up for a challenge and may be slightly crazy when it comes to planting but I’m not very optimistic that we will be growing bananas this close to Canada any time soon.

I’m only a couple months late with this… I was waiting on pictures but those can be added later I guess. I hate to get too far behind!

 

 

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Opening New Garden Ground

So last year we didn’t get to put in a garden, instead I watched progress on another that I pass on my drive to work. We changed our plans as to where the garden was going to go so nothing was planted. The year before I was too excited to get planting and things didn’t turn out well. You can bet I am itching to get back out there. I’ve got my seed list ordered. I cut way back from the initial list I had planned. It was a little disappointing but I just added them to the 2017 garden plans (yes, I have already started those too.)

With none of my own planting to tend last year I got my “gardening fix” as best I could through reading all sorts of farm and garden books. It’s always a good time to learn something new! All that reading has both complicated and simplified my garden planning. I now have spreadsheet upon spreadsheet that I used to put my garden map together. It started with planning the CSA gardens. Everything I have read about running a successful CSA comes back to precise planning and lots of record keeping. My plan is to have CSA shares available for the summer of 2017, for that to happen I needed to start some serious planning in the fall of 2015. I know it seems like a long ways off but seeing the binder of spreadsheets I’ve got started, well, it’s a good thing I started when I did!

Those spreadsheets and maps will only take me so far. There comes a time when I just need to get out there and plant. That is what this summer is for. Planning this summer’s garden wasn’t quite as challenging as the one for next year for a few reasons: there is less to plant, the growing season will be shorter and there is less successional planting to do for our family garden.

My focus for the family garden is some vegetables for fresh eating but the majority for preserving for winter. The focus for the CSA is the opposite, all for fresh eating and weekly harvests achieved through successional planting. Even with different purposes I will still get the missing information I will need this year to complete my plans for next year.

This year’s growing season will be shorter only because we moved the plot (twice now) since last year. Plowing new ground takes some time… and a tractor with a plow. We can make the time but will need to borrow a tractor. The family garden will be planted as soon as the ground is tilled- not the smartest plan, but I can only be so patient. The CSA plots will get tended and maintained for the summer to encourage soil health for optimum vegetable growth next year- the more correct way to go about a new garden plot.

Then there’s more fencing to do as well! The garden space is going to need a fence. A good one. There is plenty of wildlife that would love the opportunity to graze fresh vegetable as soon as they come available. That’s not okay. So a fencing we will go. It really is never ending when it comes to fencing.

But first things first, we still have some cleanup to do from the previous owners. That’s where we’ve started. We measured and flagged where the garden is going to go. Then started taking down the old garden fences that look to have been abandoned long ago. The grass has overtaken the garden mesh. Half the posts are rotted off and the others are “well-planted” and will need a bit more force to remove.

Every time we are up there good progress is made and at this point that’s all we can hope for. Just keep working on it. I can envision the end result and it’s going to be worth it!

One of many grown-in garden fences to remove
One of many grown-in garden fences to remove
The little miss "helping" during nap time.
The little miss “helping” during nap time. (and a 28 week pregnant mama)
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Gardening Vicariously Out the Car Window

“…and apologizes for her hands, which are covered with flour and dough. I show her my own hands, still stained with island soils, and tell her never to apologize for dirty hands. I am reassured when someone offers me a rough, callous mitt.”- “Fields of Plenty” by Michael Ableman

My hands are usually something that could use a apology. The constant kitchen work leaves them quite dry and rough from the constantly washing off whatever it is I am baking. The deep cold of winter and extra “work” during the holidays leaves me with a bit of carpel tunnel or early stages of arthritis. The aching feeling in my hands and wrists usually subsides late January assuming I wear mittens every time I’m outside.

Spring, summer and fall means my hands (and feet) stained a rather unpleasant shade of brownish-green. It doesn’t seem to matter how much I scrub. The callouses, though there year-round, are much more noticeable during the “non-snow” months. Between shovels, pitch forks and garden weeds there is no rest for my hands.

I appreciate someone with hands like mine. I can see the common ground between us without having to speak. For someone like me who struggles with conversation, garden stained hands gives an opening for pleasant small talk that isn’t weather based. The conversation will inevitably end up there, as talking about the weather is a true Minnesota pastime.

Driving home the other night I was temped to stop by and talk to a family that was planting a garden along the road. I didn’t of course, that would mean I would have to actually speak, but I thought about it. Over the years I have watched that garden plot thrive with vegetables for a few years, then taken over by weeds for a few and back with new owners. Last I heard, it is a father and couple sons that have it.

Last year was weeds. This year I saw they tilled it so nicely and then laid sheets of black garden plastic over the whole thing. That in itself must have been quite a task, this is not small plot. Over the next few nights I could see they were planting through the plastic and carefully marking the plants and rows with flags. They also appear to have a fence up to keep the deer out. Probably the reason for the weeds last year; gardening can be very discouraging when all you do is unwillingly feed deer.

I am curious what they have planted, how they plan to keep it watered if needed and what they are using to keep the plastic down. It’s not the first time I’ve seen this method. It’s also not the most common method in the area, so it would be nice to hear what they have to say about it at the beginning of the season and again after harvest. Over the years I have tried all sorts of things that at the beginning of the season sound like a great idea and by harvest I would never do again.

… A few weeks have gone by now (I have been slacking on finishing this post). I see them planting almost every night on my way home from work. It’s starting to look like quite the garden. I still have no idea what they have planted but it’s looking good.

The flowers I planted in the front bed must have from been too old seed. I have a lovely patch of weeds in there and no flowers that I can see. I learned years ago to not weed the flower beds until they are big enough to tell the difference between weeds and flowers. By now everything that was going to grow should be up. This late in the year I am not going to bother trying again. I will just pull the weeds and leave it empty for now.

Our vegetable garden plot in looking great so far. Our neighbor plowed up a big area between the two of us. We helped pick some rock and then he took the disc to it. Some of this will get some fresh grass seed and the rest will be vegetables next spring. I can’t wait to get some seeds in the ground next spring. The soil there is beautiful, rich, black and alive. I’m tempted to try the black plastic method next year. Maybe for half of it… I haven’t yet decided.

This no vegetable garden is a tough one for me but I am surviving. I just gawk at everyone else’s.

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